The Inner Life of Nerve Cells

“Before this research, we didn’t even know that neurons had this special mechanism to control neuropeptide function. This is why we do basic research. This is why it’s important to understand how neurons work, down to the subcellular and molecular levels.”—Kenneth Miller

Nerve cells (neurons) in the brain use small molecules called neuropeptides to converse with each other. Disruption of this communication can lead to problems with learning, memory and other brain functions. Through genetic studies in a model organism, the tiny worm C. elegans, a team led by Kenneth Miller Exit icon of the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation has uncovered a previously unknown mechanism that nerve cells use to package, move and release neuropeptides. The researchers found that a protein called CaM kinase II, which plays many roles in the brain, helps control this mechanism. Neuropeptides in worms lacking CaM kinase II spilled out from their packages before they reached their proper destinations. A more thorough understanding of how neurons work, provided by studies like this, may help researchers better target drugs to treat memory disorders and other neurological problems in humans.

This work also was funded by NIH’s National Institute of Mental Health.

Learn more:
Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation News Release Exit icon
Using Model Organisms to Study Health and Disease Fact Sheet Exit icon

2 comments on “The Inner Life of Nerve Cells

  1. A neuropeptide is just one type of neurotransmitter, made up of several amino acids linked together. Not all neurotransmitters are neuropeptides. Some neurotransmitters—including important ones like dopamine and serotonin—are composed of other types of molecules.

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