Eric Sarlin

About Eric Sarlin

Eric is a writer and editor who has covered science for a range of outlets, including research journals, educational blogs and online newsletters.

The Cell’s Mailroom

Yeast cell showing two mature, or “late” endosomes that are filled with small vesicles.

This illustration of the inside of a yeast cell shows two mature, or “late” endosomes (green-ringed structures) that are filled with small vesicles (red bubbles). Endosomes are cellular containers that can carry many types of cargo, including cellular waste, which they typically dump into vacuoles (orange). Credit: Matthew West and Greg Odorizzi, University of Colorado, Boulder.

In large offices, mailroom workers read the labels on incoming letters and packages to sort and deliver them and dispose of junk mail. In cells, these tasks—as well as importing food and other materials—fall to small cellular sacs called endosomes. Acting as mailroom staff, endosomes sort and deliver nutrients and building blocks, like amino acids, fat and sugars, to their proper destinations, and send cellular junk, like damaged proteins, to trash processors, such as vacuoles or lysosomes. Continue reading

Cool Image: A Circadian Circuit

Clock neurons (middle right, right corner and edge), leucokinin (LK) neurons (top left, top right and bottom middle), leucokinin receptor (LK-R) neurons (top left, top right and bottom middle)

This image, taken with a confocal microscope, shows how time-of-day information flows through the fruit fly brain. Clock neurons (stained in blue) communicate with leucokinin (LK) neurons (stained in red at the top left, top right and bottom middle), which, in turn, signal to leucokinin receptor (LK-R) neurons (stained in green). This circuit helps regulate daily activity in the fly. Credit: Matthieu Cavey and Justin Blau, New York University.

Feeling sleepy and dazed after the switch to daylight savings time this weekend? Your internal clocks are probably a little off and need some time to adjust.

Researchers have been studying biological clocks for decades to figure out how they control circadian rhythms, the natural 24-hour pattern of physical, mental and behavioral changes that affect sleep, appetite and metabolism. Knowing more about what makes our clocks tick could help researchers develop better therapies for sleep problems, metabolic conditions and other disorders associated with mistimed internal clocks. Continue reading