New Approach Subtypes Cancers by Shared Genetic Effects

Cancer

Cancer tumors are like snowflakes—no two ever share the same genetic mutations. Their unique characteristics make them difficult to categorize and treat. A new approach proposed by Trey Ideker and his team at the University of California, San Diego, might offer a solution. Their approach, called network-based stratification (NBS), identifies cancer subtypes by how different mutations in different cancer patients affect the same biological networks, such as genetic pathways. As proof of principle, they applied the method to ovarian, uterine and lung cancer data to obtain biological and clinical information about mutation profiles. Such cancer subtyping shows promise in helping to develop more effective, personalized treatments.

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University of California, San Diego News Release Exit icon
Ideker Lab Exit icon

Chemist Phil Baran Joins “Genius” Ranks as MacArthur Fellow

Cake decorated with a two-dimensional structure of the molecule, stephacidin B
When Baran’s research team succeeds in synthesizing an important natural product, the group sometimes celebrates with a cake decorated with a two-dimensional structure of the molecule. This molecule, stephacidin B, was isolated from a fungus and has anticancer properties. See images of other Baran lab cakes Exit icon.

As a newly appointed MacArthur Fellow, Phil Baran Exit icon is now officially a genius. The MacArthur award recognizes “exceptionally creative” individuals who have made significant contributions to their field and are expected to continue doing so. Baran, a synthetic organic chemist at Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, Calif., was recognized today for “inventing efficient, scalable, and environmentally sound methods” for building, from scratch, molecules produced in nature. Many of these natural products have medicinal properties. Baran has already concocted a host of natural products, including those with the ability to kill bacteria or cancer cells. In addition to emphasizing the important pharmaceutical applications of his work, Baran embraces its creative aspects: “The area of organic chemistry is such a beautiful one because one can be both an artist and an explorer at the same time,” he said in the MacArthur video interview Exit icon.

Learn more:

NIGMS “Meet a Chemist” Profile of Baran
NIH Director’s Blog Post on Baran’s Recent Work